• Dengue Virus

Dengue IgG/IgM Microwell Serum ELISA Catalog# DEN-G/M (Export Only)

Dengue fever, caused by any of the four serotypes of dengue virus, is endemic in Southeast Asia as well as South and Central America. Repeat infection with a second type of dengue virus is thought to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever in about 10 percent of infected people. Dengue antibodies do not confer immunity beyond 3-6 weeks to a second dengue type. Epidemiological factors, clinical findings (including fever, tachycardia, thrombocytopenia, etc.), exposure in endemic regions, and other laboratory results should be considered in diagnosing acute disease. Acute disease diagnosis will also include a positive laboratory confirmation in many cases. Infection with dengue virus can result in a wide disease spectrum, from a mild fever to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome.1 Symptoms of classical dengue fever, following a 5-8 day incubation period, include rash, severe headache, nausea, vomiting, chills, malaise, macular rash and may include lymphadenopathy. Hemorrhagic dengue fever involves increased blood vessel permeability which can lead to shock and death in about 10% of reported cases. Dengue fever can only be treated by supportive care and is prevented by mosquito control. In primary infections, circulating IgM antibody to the viral coat proteins is detected 5-6 days after the onset of illness, and gradually decreases within 1-2 months of onset. IgG antibody to dengue virus is detected approximately 14 days after onset in primary infections, and by day 2 in secondary infections. In secondary infections, IgM antibody may reappear but gradually diminishes, while IgG antibody persists, often at high titer. These patterns of dengue antibody development permit serological differentiation of primary and secondary infections. Characteristically, acute patients with primary infections have a higher IgM:IgG ratio than are found in secondary infections. Patients with secondary infections generally have higher IgG levels. Acute or recent infections are identified by a rise in antibody titer as well as high IgM levels.


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